Class 41 Oil Steam Locomotive
Class 41 Oil Steam Locomotive
Class 41 Oil Steam Locomotive
Class 41 Oil Steam Locomotive

Most Important Facts

Article No. 88275
Gauge / Design type Z / 1:220
Era III
Kind Steam Locomotives
Spare parts list Order spare parts Compact view Copy link
planned delivery: 4th quarter 2020 Find Dealer

Highlights

  • Mostly new tooling.
  • Locomotive running gear and body constructed of metal.
  • Finely detailed valve gear and drive/side rods.
  • Modeling of the braking system, inductive magnet, track clearance devices, etc.
  • Motor with a bell-shaped armature.
  • Inset cab windows.
  • Warm white LEDs for the headlights.
Class 41 Oil Steam Locomotive

Product

Model: The locomotive is mostly new tooling that is finely detailed with a high-performance boiler (new design). The locomotive body is constructed of metal and has inset cab windows along with correct modeling of the details (smoke stack, cab, vents, etc.). The sanding pipes, imitations of brakes, inductive magnet, track clearance devices, and other details on the underside of the locomotive are modelled. The valve gear and drive/side rods are finely detailed and fully functional. The...

Model: The locomotive is mostly new tooling that is finely detailed with a high-performance boiler (new design). The locomotive body is constructed of metal and has inset cab windows along with correct modeling of the details (smoke stack, cab, vents, etc.). The sanding pipes, imitations of brakes, inductive magnet, track clearance devices, and other details on the underside of the locomotive are modelled. The valve gear and drive/side rods are finely detailed and fully functional. The locomotive has a motor with a bell-shaped armature. All four driving axles are powered. Warm white LEDs are used for the headlights. The tender has spoked wheels.

more

One-time production only for Märklin Insider members.

Publications

- Special Imprint and Special Products - New items brochure 2020

Prototype information

The Class 41 The locomotive building industry developed the class 41 2-8-2 locomotive for fast freight trains as part of the DRG's standardized locomotive program. Schwartzkopff delivered two sample units in 1936. The frame was a new development; the boiler was the same as on the class 03, but was designed on the class 41 for 20 atmospheres or 290 pounds pressure per square inch. The axle load could be set at 18 tons or 20 tons per axle. The resulting class 41 was for the first time a...

The Class 41 The locomotive building industry developed the class 41 2-8-2 locomotive for fast freight trains as part of the DRG's standardized locomotive program. Schwartzkopff delivered two sample units in 1936. The frame was a new development; the boiler was the same as on the class 03, but was designed on the class 41 for 20 atmospheres or 290 pounds pressure per square inch. The axle load could be set at 18 tons or 20 tons per axle. The resulting class 41 was for the first time a general-purpose locomotive that could be used anywhere. The two pre-production units were followed by 364 regular production locomotives that were improved somewhat and that were delivered by almost all of the German locomotive builders by 1941. These locomotives could run at 90 km/h or 56 mph and had 1,900 horsepower; they were used almost everywhere. After World War II, there were 216 locomotives on the DB's roster. It was soon found out that the type St47K boilers were worn out. Since the class 41 was indispensable, the DB developed a completely welded, high-performance boiler with a combustion chamber as a replacement. Compared to the previous long tube boiler, this version had a higher ratio of premium radiant heating surface and could therefore support a greater load. Between 1957 and 1961, 102 class 41 locomotives were equipped with this new boiler at the maintenance facility in Braunschweig. Together with the front skirting being removed, this resulted in a considerably new look for the class 41 locomotives. Forty (40) of these converted locomotives were also equipped for oil firing. The last grate-fired converted units were retired in 1971.

more

Features

$ ! ) F 3 Y

Warning

ATTENTION: adults only
Show cookie popup